Open-World Games and Fast Travel

Over the past couple of years, I’ve been more and more fond of Open World Games and I noticed that a mechanic that a lot of games seem to share is… fast travel. It seems nearly essential to the genre at this point since a lot of players need the option to travel long distances very fast in games that are this expansive… at the same time, though, I feel like there are better ways of handling things than to just create vast empty worlds for the sake of the player’s “freedom” only to then chug in fast travel points.

Once you’ve been somewhere in Skyrim, for instance, you can fast travel there quickly via the map… for free… Before that, you’ll need to either use carriages stationed near the main gate or you’ll have to ride/walk there by yourself. It’s a bit of an issue in my opinion when you have such an interesting world full of side quests and adventures on its road… and then you just make travelling by foot obsolete because there’s a faster way of doing things. It’s not like you’re forced to use the feature, either, it’s just that it feels wrong to have it there in the first place. I mean, once you unlock it, you’re more inclined to use it… especially with annoying systems like stamina and whatever in-place. If you’ve played Skyrim before, you’ll know that there are plenty of assassin’s, side quests and other encounters along the paths of the game. You’ll fight against trolls, bandits and even witches if you’re not careful about the territory you’re heading into… Similarly, you can also find allies, merchants and quest lines that may reward you. You see NPCs strolling the world, travelling from one place to another… and the world feels less vast and empty but actually just big and somewhat lively… Skyrim isn’t perfect but in that regard, I actually really liked it as an Open World game since not using fast travel seems to almost reward you… or you’re less inclined to use it frequently since you’ll miss a big part of the game… the Sidequests.

Just recently, I started playing Yakuza 0 and again, Side Quests are a huge part of the game. The main storyline is great but the side quests are what’s selling the game to me, really, with these “substories” being either hilarious or just crazy… to the point where they enhance the whole experience by a lot. Hence, you get rewarded for not using the taxi stations that are scattered around the city… and while they are available to you, they don’t take you everywhere either, so I feel like there’s a good balance between things. Now, in the end game, I’ve been using the fast travel option a lot more though since I’ve noticed that the game is sending me more often to areas like Sotenbori’s Grand and another place (no spoilers)… two spots that are rather far away. I’d assume that the long travel between these two spots is probably supposed to make the playtime get extended a bit more… You may find substories or special encounters during the travel to and from the Grand… but those aren’t limited to the time and you may get to them later on, too, which is why I’ve been using fast travel more often when it’s really just the whole “get there, grab this, come back, go there again, come back again” routine.

Now, what’s really annoying fast-travel wise is when the world is actually really beautiful and travelling on the back of a boar or deer is fun… jumping from roof to roof is also amazing and the little encounters on your journey are amazing but since the world doesn’t feature many allies or neutral NPCs… or just people that would make the journey more interesting, the world feels less alive, which makes sense… but it gives you less reason to actually sit back and enjoy travelling by foot or by ride. Instead, you’ll fast-travel once you’ve unlocked the feature, which is a bit of an issue, in my opinion. I may have complained about there being no fast travel back then… but I also complained about there being fast travel once it got unlocked and I would have prefered to not have the option at all instead of having it shoved into my face, in a way… if that makes sense.

And well, there are also games like Sleeping Dogs that are just super beautiful and even if the world isn’t full of many encounters and even if the game is a tad older at this point, the beautiful lights and the amazing soundtrack really are reason enough to hijack a car or motorbike to drive to your destination instead of actually just teleporting there.

All in all, I feel like fast travel can take away a lot of the game. Sure, you don’t have to use it, and I’ve more recently started to abstain from the feature completely for the sake of exploration and the immersive feeling of the games I’ve been playing… but when games rely on fast travel in the first place, you end up with problems arising, like the storylines feeling tedious, the world feeling empty, and a lot of the in-game mechanics like rides, stamina, or even enemy encounters potentially feeling rather annoying. I think games should use fast travel rather infrequently with maybe a teleport function or whatever for super long distances… or they tie fast travel to a fee or something like that. The Assassin’s Creed Games, Skyrim, as well as Yakuza 0 have that in their games where you pay a fee to use the carriages or, in Yakuza’s case, a taxi to bring you to a different place… and you can’t just go everywhere… at least not in Yakuza. Instead, you have to go to select points or wager if it is worth the fee.

Rules like that limit the use you get out of fast travel. There surely are a lot better examples for good fast travel mechanics or limiters… or ways of implementing it without harming the experience. Do you know any of those or maybe even games that make fast travel annoying and feel bad because the actual journey to certain points is just better? Do you ever skip out on fast travel? Let me know!

Cheers!

This post was first published on Indiecator by Dan Indiecator aka MagiWasTaken. If you like what you see here and want to see more, you can check me out on Twitch and YouTube as well.

Modding in Games

I was always a bit reluctant with modding games. The only titles that I’ve ever modded were Minecraft (stuff like Mo’ Creatures, Optifine, Inventory Tweaks, or Shaders) and The Binding of Isaac: Afterbirth+ (that mod that tells you what the items do), so I figured I should try and broaden my horizon a little bit and explain as to why mods are good and why I hesitated so much with installing a lot of things.

For starters, I’d like to point out that I don’t hate mods entirely. For me it’s just a bit hard to install them and I end up doing something wrong somewhere, so I need to redo everything, and then I give it up altogether, resulting in a rather unpleasant experience. At the same time, some mods disable Achievements in games on Steam and I ended up avoiding mods due to that reason, especially as I didn’t know what games did it and which ones didn’t do it. I’m not a completionist by any means and I expressed some thoughts on Achievements before as well… but I still kind of care about them and don’t like playing a game while they are disabled as it kind of bothers me. 

Mods are great though. Stuff like Optifine or Shaders can make a game like Minecraft actually rather pretty and add a lot of nice details to the world, even without you running that raytracing stuff (is that out already btw? Asking for a friend). At the same time, there are plenty of mods that add more content to a game without taking too much away from the vanilla-experience or they add so much awesome stuff to the game that it becomes an entirely new experience, which is amazing. There are also cases where games only are held together and popular because of the modding community, which is amazing and which must be a good thing. 

But despite modding being such a common thing, I still kind of hesitated to install any in some of the games that I played. I ended up shoving aside the idea of modding RimWorld as I wanted to learn how to play the vanilla game, first. At the same, there are titles like Skyrim or Torchlight that have fantastic examples of community-made content that maybe (or probably?) surpasses the original developers’ ideas and creativity. New classes, smarter pets and enhanced GUI in Torchlight’s case or new enemies, more character customization and roleplaying capabilities in Skyrim’s. The potential is basically endless and I felt like I should maybe try it out myself.

Alas, I started up Stardew Valley again, which is a great and very underpriced title that I’ve only spent a hundred hours in so far. I last played it on March 23rd 2020, so I was a bit rusty… and with new additions that were made to the games, I was a bit hesitant of starting it up again. But well, I figured, I may as well try it out with the Expanded mod among others, to give it a completely new vibe and more interesting things to discover as well as new NPCs to romance and new crops to place down. 

The picture below shows the installed mods that I’ve chosen. I used a Pastebin that KingArgaroth shared for his playthrough of this mod pack and alas, I figured I may as well copy that and share it with y’all. Make sure to check him out if you haven’t yet! I talked about him and other great streamers briefly in this post here. The mods mentioned in the Pastebin technically make use of SMAPI but I ended up having trouble with that, so I opted in for “ModDrop” which is a piece of software that made the whole process A LOT easier. I installed a lot of mods that are needed for both Stardew Valley Expanded and for Ridgeside Village. Both of these mods add a lot of new areas, events, dialogue options, features, and NPCs to the game. Apart from that, I also made use of the Season Villager Outfits that are actually quite lovely and the Dynamic Night-Time mod. 

In today’s stream, I then started it up for the first time and to my surprise it went quite well. There was a hiccup at the beginning where it took a while to load but honestly, that’s quite understandable when there is so much going on in the game and when there are so many mods involved. I didn’t have any issues after that with it apart from the Experience Bars Mod (that I now uninstalled) constantly showing… and I need to add a mod to update the map to also feature Ridgeside Village… but other than that it worked pretty well.

I’m quite overwhelmed with all of the content but overall, it was more than enjoyable. The new farm layout is fantastic and the new NPCs in the game are a lot more diverse and fun than the previous ones who all felt a bit one-dimensional… From RSV’s Flor, Corine and Maddie to SDVE’s Sophia there are plenty of cool characters in the game… but it’s actually not that easy to decide on who to potentially date/marry yet as the bachelors in the game are all rather cute as well and as I haven’t gotten to know them all just yet. 

But yeah, I really enjoyed that experience. ModDrop really helped with the hurdle of installing things easily… and the mods that I used actually don’t disable achievements, which is also incredibly cool. Looking forward to playing more soon!

Have you ever modded a game before and what were your experiences with the install-process and the game itself? What are your opinions? Do you like modding games or are you more of a Vanilla-Only person? Let me know!

Cheers!

This post was first published on Indiecator by Dan Indiecator aka MagiWasTaken. If you like what you see here and want to see more, you can check me out on Twitch and YouTube as well.

I want to be evil but not too evil

Ever since I was a child, I’ve loved the idea of summoners and necromancers. Skeletons are cute and the idea of resurrecting fallen (potentially enemy) warriors to fight by your side is a great idea and I love the whole thematic around it. However, when it comes to games, I feel like there aren’t enough games that let you do something that is so immoral. In a way, reviving corpses is desecration, after all, right?

Similarly, I love it when games let you perform choices that are immoral in a way, even when I myself in real life (at least the human that I pretend to be) would never do anything like that. In Fable, for instance, you can decide if you want to be an angelic hero of justice… or you just slaughter people, rob the poor, take bribes, and sacrifice people to the Chapel of Skorm in order to gain your lovely devil horns and your demonic aura.

And I know, I know… Being bad is… bad. Obviously. I’d never kill anyone in real life or I’d perform robbery… but the aspect of being this character that you could never embody in real life is actually quite intriguing and I feel like there are not enough games that let you do. Of course, you have these few titles with two different endings that let you be “bad” or “good” and it influences your ending which then… blablabla… Bioshock 1 and 2 did that btw where you could show mercy on people and rescue the Little Sisters or you could kill them and harvest the little brats and it would give you a different ending… but I feel like those games aren’t going far enough. You basically just have two choices: Right or wrong. Good or evil. But there are a lot of things beyond good and evil (great game btw) that let can’t just be seen as inherently evil or good. Robbing people would be bad but what if you redistribute the money you rob to the poor to enable them to live, for instance? Or what if you have to kill someone to save someone else (like with the Trolley problem)?

Games often try to make you believe that there are only two choices and that you can’t be in the middle or go even further… it’s a bit of a habit that some companies have to make it easier for themselves, and I find it somewhat lazy.

Catherine Classic does a great job by letting you achieve one of nine endings ranging from “very evil” to “very good” and it has some neutral endings in the middle… but the problem with that game is that it still abides the traditional values of “good” (aka marrying, only having sex to reproduce, no fetishes, etc.) and “evil” (aka Lust, hedonism, cheating, fetishes, etc.). You have to answer some questions and based on your answer it (sometimes rather randomly) assigns a value to your Karma that basically influences your ending. Your texts with either Katherine or Catherine also influence your ending… and generally, the game wants you to think that going for Catherine is bad and that going for Katherine is good… despite there being plenty of things that are wrong with Katherine. Just a hot take, I guess.

Overlord does a great job of letting you chose what to do. You get to become an “evil” Overlord and either save towns and be celebrated or enslave them and be hated and feared. You’re not just some bad guy but you’re actually THE Overlord that rules Hell itself… or at least your dark domain. The game lets you perform whatever choice you want to perform as you’re kind of the hero of your own story. The heroes that are in the game that oppose you, more often than not, seem to be twisted themselves and resemble caricatures of hero tropes, which is a great take, in my opinion. Dungeon Keeper lets you experience the story of some sort of evil being that is creating the living space for the undead, the monsters and the other evil beings that get threatened by those pesky humans. Fable lets you be a devil. In Skyrim, you can be an outlaw.

My point is that these games don’t judge you for being bad but they don’t condone it. When you perform an evil deed, you’ll notice and the characters will treat you differently. Fable has this weird thing where you get booed and insulted by everyone if you go for an evil playthrough, even though everyone is afraid of you… which is kind of silly in a way. In Overlord, you actually receive rewards for being the good guy and saving people and stuff. In Skyrim, you can murder bandits and nobody will judge you, even when murder is bad… and you can join a creed of assassins… which is quite cool, y’know? In Carrion, you’re the monster that is escaping a research facility… and you murder everyone… and that’s cool. The game WANTS you to be evil and I love that!

But how far can you take this? I feel like there are boundaries that you shouldn’t cross, I’d just love it if we could still move more freely into this chaotic evil kind of playstyle in games where you’re the villain and do bad things but don’t take it too far. I feel like it should be possible for you to be the bad guy in games without getting judged for it by the developers and without the game putting you at a disadvantage. I’d love it if games would more often get into that mindset of this evil lich or other villaineous beings that try to conquer the world. I’d love it if you could play as a skeleton (like in Skul or Osteoblasts) more often instead of this scrawny Prince Charming that saves the day yet again.

Obviously, games shouldn’t take things too far. I don’t think that you need to show how someone slowly thrusts a knife into someone’s throat (talking about The Last Of Us 2 btw) or how your character tortures someone by pulling out their fingernails or by breaking their fingers one by one (like in GTA V)… I also don’t think that you need to murder children (I’d never do that in Bioshock btw) or that you need to r*pe women in games to be “evil”. You don’t need to kick puppies or burn people alive in order to be able to play out that fantasy. I think games don’t need to go that far but they still should allow some sort of freedom. They should restrict the player when it comes to things like the points mentioned above but also allow you some freedom of choice when it comes to “do you want to be evil or good or somewhere in-between?” and I feel like I haven’t seen too many games that pulled that off well. Beholder has some interesting mechanics and ways of letting you do things that aren’t ethical to potentially save people… and it also allows you to do similar things to do bad things or punish people or frame them. Meanwhile Catherine Classic was quite obvious when it came to what choices the game wants us to make to achieve certain endings.

So, frankly, I’d love to be the villain in more games. I’d love it if I could be that demonic character that conquers the world or that heroes want to defeat… I’d love it if I could play games with characters like that more often and I’d love it if games would let me have that choice without pushing me onto some sort of path that is rather obvious.

I feel like that could be great. I feel like that’s something that I’d enjoy and that other people could potentially enjoy playing as well and that games need to explore more often. Obviously, we don’t need a game where you just assault people and r*** them and whatever. I think that certain boundaries are obvious to anyone.

Edit: I’ve added the example of Carrion to one of the paragraphs as I love that game and I forgot to mention it despite intending to. #fixed

What do you think? Do you know any games that do this quite well? Let me know!

Cheers!

This post was first published on Indiecator by Dan Indiecator aka MagiWasTaken. If you like what you see here and want to see more, you can check me out on Twitch and YouTube as well.

TSS#37 – Five Games Challenge

What games would I choose if I only had five games available to me? What’s this “challenge” Naithin of timetoloot.com is taking part in? Why are we doing this at all?

Well, today’s Stray Sheep is about these questions and my thoughts on the topic, on top of my selection! Enjoy 🙂


On the 5th of October, twitter user @Octav1usKitten published this tweet here, kicking off a “challenge” of sorts, where one has to pick five games to play for a whole year! Later on The Gaming Diaries, they made a post, listing their choice of games, which lead to quite a lot of people in our nice little Blaugust-community to share lists of their own and… well, then there’s Naithin. 

Naithin from timetoloot.com went as far as creating an actual challenge of playing only those five games for the entirety of November (and maybe even later on as well?), which you may look up the hither side of the internet.

If you’re interested in doing anything like that, go check out his rules. If you’re interested in seeing what it’s like to limit oneself to only five games, check out Naithin’s blog. 

Anyways, while this is surely interesting, I thought about making a post about my theory of the best game-combination and then submitting a list of my own to the world wide web! 


So, at first, I’d like to say that it’s hard for me to stick to one game for a great time-span. My steam library shows it as most of my games are around the 6- to 9-hour mark. Usually, I get bored with a game or need to take a break from it after a few hours of total game time and then a rather long break happens and I forget the controls and mechanics and then some real-life-stuff happens and I suddenly won’t play a game anymore. That happened in Assassin’s Creed 1’s case (RIP Late to the Party #3) and it also happened to a ton of other games. (I’ll get to it in the future for sure, though!)

Hence, if I were to make a list of games to play, I’d probably have to not only cover a vast range of genres in those five games but also make it a list of games that I could replay a ton! 

So, I think, that the challenge behind playing only five games for a year is the fact that you need a certain amount of variety in it. A variety in Genres isn’t needed, in my opinion, though! I think the trick to “surviving on five games for a whole year” (as someone who plays games a lot more than a “normie”, of course) is being able to play the heck out of those games and to have a variety between pairs of games and not between the genres.

Off to my list then!

1 – My first game would be a rogue-like to make things different on each run!

Thanks to procedural generation and some other mechanics there’s a new challenge after every death! Rogue-likes usually feature a ton of different combinations of powerful items to make every run special while also providing one with a rather simple approach on the story/plotline!

Therefore I’m choosing Enter The Gungeon!

It’s a bullet-hell-type of twin-stick-shooter/rogue-like game with a few different characters, a ton of different guns, and even more puns! I haven’t played too much of it for quite some time (and it received a lot of updates in that time) which is why I’m still rather new to it and will have to learn everything again!

Honourable mentions would be: The Binding of Isaac Rebirth/Afterbirth, Dead Cells, Cultist Simulator, Nuclear Throne, Risk of Rain 2, and Slay The Spire.

2 – For this game I would choose a story-heavy RPG that features a lot of stuff to do.

An Open-World-title would be great here, too, especially as there’s a lot of Loot-Shooters (like the Borderlands franchise) that would cover those points.

I’m choosing The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim for this one!

I’ve never played “through” Skyrim and usually only took certain sides, did certain quests and never tried the other side of the same game! Also there’s DLCs that I’ve never touched on top of MODS that I’ve never installed. I know people that have sank in about a thousand hours (or even more at this point!) into Skyrim and I guess that Skyrim would be great as the second game.

In Contrast to Enter The Gungeon there’s a lot less puns (if any at all) in Skyrim which is a bit of a bummer (jk) but there’s a lot more options when it comes to character customization, role-play, stories, and choices! I feel like this would be important when it comes to the challenge here. When you’re tired of “too much story” or when you don’t have too much time, you go for a rogue-like-run. When you’ve got more time or you’re frustrated with the random aspects, just tune into Skyrim with a lot more scripted events, weird and funny bu- I mean, features… and a bigger world!

Hounourable mentions: Borderlands 2, Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel, Breathedge, and Warframe!

3 – For the third game I’d choose a competitive game that can be played with friends and that features a high skill cap!

Competitive games usually demand a lot of people, like map awareness, high APM, map knowledge, game knowledge, good decision making, and a ton more. In shooter games you’ve got to be good at aiming and know a lot about different strategies, for instance. I mostly play RTS or MOBA games when it comes to competitive games, though…

Therefore my choice here is League of Legends.

Well, I already play it almost every day for a round or two after uni, so I guess it wouldn’t be too hard to guess that I’d include this title. I only reached Gold IV this season, hence there’s plenty of leg-room for improvement and training to do. I’m also missing only about 8 champions and there’re many champs that I haven’t played at all, yet, so maybe there’s some more I like, on top of new champions coming out soon, including the new Support-Marksman, Senna.

As a Support-Main, there’s also a lot then I can learn in the Role-Department. I play Mid-Lane and ADC sometimes and am rather average on those lanes. Occassionally I try myself at Jungling (as it’s basically a Support for the whole map) and my worst lane is the Top Lane, mostly as I find it rather boring (being isolated from the rest of the map and all of that^^).

I enjoy playing LoL and I like the community, so I won’t go into the whole “Supporting a company full of bad people”-debate. There’s cool and inclusive rioters for sure at Riot Games, just like there’s probably good Blizzard employees.. and I doubt that there’re any companies in the video game industry that are inherently good or inherently bad.

Honourable mentions would be: Heroes of the Storm, Starcraft 2, and, I guess, Overwatch.

4 – For this I’d choose a game that you can play for a great amount of time with, again, a ton of things to do without any pressure.

Competitive game can be tilting, frustrating and stressful, hence a relaxed game would be great complement to those. On one side there’s League of Legends

…and then there’s Stardew Valley!

I. Love. It. 

I guess that Graveyard Keeper is scratching the same needs while also being a lot darker and recently having a tavern added to it on top of other updates… but sadly, Graveyard Keeper is finite while Stardew Valley’s “story” is infinite with always something to do and plenty of updates coming rather frequently!

Hence, honourable mentions: Graveyard Keeper, Autonauts, Forager, and Diablo 3 (I find the grinding rather relaxing in D3, tbh).

5 – Anything goes, hence my choice here is Monster Hunter World:

It has cool fights, awesome armours, weapons and also the Palico Cats that support you and are rather cute! There’s also some RPG aspects, challenging content and a wide range of weapons!

I’d also be able to support friends using that support-horn-thingy (yep, I haven’t played it, yet, but I love all MHW-Streams and -Videos, I’ve seen so far, and I can’t wait to play it with some friends from my old school).

The last game (in my theory) is a game that one can sink a lot of time into for the sake of enjoying it. Something you haven’t covered yet, something that you like, something that you haven’t played enough of. You can add another genre, stack more genres, whatever, as long as you enjoy it. (Or rather, I found this the most efficient thing to do)

Honourable mentions: Nier; Automata, Warframe, Risk of Rain 2, Minecraft, Terraria, Hearthstone, and Dungeon Of The Endless.

So there’s a plot-less game, a plot-heavy game, a competitive game, a relaxed game, and finally, a game one loves to bits that one can play all year long.

So, this is my idea of the best way of choosing games. Of course, “rogue-likes” aren’t necessarily the way to go for everyone but you can surely change that out for a card game, a racing game, a phone game or anything else that scratches your urges and is rather lite on the story but offers a ton of replay value. The second game would cover the need for interesting plots and lore on top of the RPG-needs^^

What are your thoughts on these? Is there anything that you’d choose differently or would your choice/strategy be similar? 

Also, on the last note, I won’t participate in a challenge like this at all….or rather not at this point. As I want to proceed with reviews on this blog, I’d like to not be limited to five games only for a year, as that’d mean that there’d be, at max, five reviews! Or at least some other kinds of content that I’m not quite sure of yet. At least, I wouldn’t be able to show off some of those nice Indie Games out there.

Anyways, feel free to discuss my “strategy” and my choice of games or even submit your list of games! Also check out King Octav1usNaithin, and The Gaming Diaries!

Have a nice day 🙂

Note: I changed the Header to now just say “TSS#xx” instead of “The Stray Sheep #xx” as I thought that’d be a bit better. Any thoughts on that?

I’m taking part in this year’s #IntPiPoMo. If you’d like to participate or get to know the other participants, feel free to check this post out!

The Stray Sheep #4 – Arachnophobia and Videogame Spiders

Here’s Elise from League of Legends – with the Bloodmoon Skin

Well, hello there, everyone!
Today we’re talking about my arachnophobia. I’m scared of spiders. Being quite tall and all that doesn’t make it better, but a lot funnier for other people seeing me get scared by a thing that probably isn’t even out to kill me. I just hate them. It’s mostly due to the fact that some of them get so insanely huge while some others suddenly move super fast. What I hate most about them is the fact that they seem to vanish like ninjas whenever I look away for a second! When I know where they are, it’s alright, when they aren’t too big.. but when I don’t, I get freaked out and have to resist trying to burn my house down.

Anyways, I didn’t want to just admit my angst of things that may crawl into my mouth while I’m sleeping. No, I wanted to tell you about video games and spiders and what I hate about those games.

Well, in most RPGs and MMOs there’s those typical mobs like Slimes…and Wolves…and spiders! Like, wtf? Why does it have to be spiders? And why are they so big all the time? When I started playing Skyrim, there was this huge spider that I was really disgusted by! But a while I got used to it and found it kind of…cute. I don’t know. Especially after it died. Then, after it died, I used my necromancy-skill to revive it as a companion! I mean, what harm is a spider going to be if it just kills other spiders for me,…right?

Thanks to Ninja43092#8533 on the IGP-Discord for taking a screen of it! My Skyrim didn’t want to start up, so..yeah. Thanks!

Well, that’s where I’m wrong, because that fucking spider crawled to me and followed me everywhere. It wasn’t just a spider-boss anymore either. It was a zombie-spider-boss-companion that followed me to wherever I went. And the faster you ran, the faster it followed, making it a lot more scary. Once you stop, it runs past you and may even go through you, letting you see those legs, that butt and it’s zombie-spider-queen-boss-monstrosity of a head up close! I don’t know why I revived it in the first place when I was able to kill other spiders without problem. I probably just wanted to find out if that works. Luckily, the spell ran out after a while and the monstrosity I created has vanished into dust and ashes.

There’s also “Elise” in League of Legends. When I first played her (wanted to try her out), I got so disgusted by her that I ended up going AFK. It was my first time that I’d ever go AFK while in a round of LoL but it was worth the reports I got since I didn’t have to stare at a champion that can transform into a fucking spider. Apparently the lead designer of Elise was also quite scared of spiders and just signed off the champion without looking at her. After a while I got used to her, it’s just still kind of annoying to play as her. Against her? No problem, just kill it with fire. As her? Not so much.

There are quite a few other games that have fucking spiders in them but it never was as disgusting as in Skyrim, in my opinion…. And then there’s Satisfactory. It’s a cool game that I haven’t played at all and that I don’t even own because it’s on Epic Games and I’m boycotting that for some reasons, but I’ve seen people play it and it looks like fun.. BUT there’s small spider creatures in there that move really fast as well and you’re actually able to deal with them by simply turning on “arachnophobia mode” where it replaces all of those creepy spider-thingies with Cat-sprites! Static cat sprites! It’s great! I love it! Please add that to every game! There’s probably a mod like that for Skyrim. May need to check that out!

Are there any things that you get scared by in video games? And how did you like this post here? Let me know in the comments if you don’t mind 🙂

Anyways, cheers!

This post is part of a contest/challenge called Blaugust! The goal is to post as much as possible and participants are awarded with different prizes depending on the goal they achieved. My aim is to post on all 31 days of August and if you’d like to know more about this “event”, you should check this post out.